@Bcast_Md

Special Collections in Mass Media and Culture

14 notes

heck-yeah-old-tech:

Most people never change the needle on their record player. Consider an old Victrola, where you were expected to change it every time you played a record. Yeah, no, once in a day was still pushing it.

heck-yeah-old-tech:

Most people never change the needle on their record player. Consider an old Victrola, where you were expected to change it every time you played a record. Yeah, no, once in a day was still pushing it.

12 notes

fadedsignals:

By the mid-1970s, the network radio business changed considerably.  After radio’s golden age ended in the 1950s, networks catered to the increasing fragmentation of radio formats popping up around the country.  Here’s a 1974 ad from CBS Radio Network, touting its most recent programming concepts.

fadedsignals:

By the mid-1970s, the network radio business changed considerably.  After radio’s golden age ended in the 1950s, networks catered to the increasing fragmentation of radio formats popping up around the country.  Here’s a 1974 ad from CBS Radio Network, touting its most recent programming concepts.

(via wordfromoursponsor)

9 notes

The Andrews Sisters were an American close harmony singing group of the swing and boogie-woogie eras. The group consisted of three sisters: contralto LaVerne Sophia (1911–1967), soprano Maxine Angelyn “Maxene” (1916–1995), and mezzo-soprano Patricia Marie “Patty” (1918–2013).
Throughout their long career, the sisters sold well over 75 million records (the last official count released by MCA Records in the mid-1970s). Their 1941 hit “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy" can be considered an early example of rhythm and blues or jump blues. The Andrews Sisters’ harmonies and songs are still influential today. (Wiikipedia)

The Andrews Sisters were an American close harmony singing group of the swing and boogie-woogie eras. The group consisted of three sisters: contralto LaVerne Sophia (1911–1967), soprano Maxine Angelyn “Maxene” (1916–1995), and mezzo-soprano Patricia Marie “Patty” (1918–2013).

Throughout their long career, the sisters sold well over 75 million records (the last official count released by MCA Records in the mid-1970s). Their 1941 hit “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy" can be considered an early example of rhythm and blues or jump blues. The Andrews Sisters’ harmonies and songs are still influential today. (Wiikipedia)

156 notes

magictransistor:

Kuna Mola:  RCA Dog, 1970s, Artist Unknown, 13.5 x 17 inches, cotton; 3 layers (black, orange, maroon); reverse and direct appliqué, embroidery, collection of  Joyce Cheney.
“Perro (dog) Musica”  is the famous RCA advertisement of a dog listening for its master’s voice.   

magictransistor:

Kuna MolaRCA Dog, 1970s, Artist Unknown, 13.5 x 17 inches, cotton; 3 layers (black, orange, maroon); reverse and direct appliqué, embroidery, collection of  Joyce Cheney.

“Perro (dog) Musica”  is the famous RCA advertisement of a dog listening for its master’s voice.   

(via magictransistor)

13 notes

tube-radio:

Kinori (Israel).

The name Kinori derives from the Hebrew word כינור [kinor] which means fiddle. This explains the fiddle on the company logo.

20 notes

oldshowbiz:

After the success of NBC Radio’s entertainment magazine news program Monitor in the late 1950s and 1960s, ABC tried their own hand with a program called Flair. Initially hosted by Dick Van Dyke, the informal daytime magazine program regularly featured comedians Milt Kamen, Wayne & Shuster and Jonathan Winters.

11 notes

00radiogaga00:

From my personal collection which is in its infancy.

On the left: Panasonic T-53 Six Transistor shirt pocket radio. Takes a standard 9V. Works.

On the right: Magnavox AM-80 Eight Transistor shirt pocket radio. Takes some kinda crazy battery like a round 9V. I’ll have to look into it more. I’m not sure if it works. This one is near mint. The Top Grain leather case is marked Ak Sar Ben 100 Club.

Upon some quick research, Ak Sar Ben is Nebraska spelled backwards and represents a community among other things in Omaha.

I’ve decided that these are the types of radios I’d like to collect rather than the larger tube table tops and portables. I still respect their beauty immensely, but I just don’t have the space. 

I hope you enjoy.