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Special Collections in Mass Media and Culture

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oldshowbiz:

Charlie Chan’s entry into the Late, Late Show market, 1954.

Long before the overabundance of chat shows, CBS owned-and-operated stations — most notably WCBS-TV in New York City and WBBM-TV in Chicago — ended the day with an old movie under the heading “The Late Show.” WCBS in New York followed this with another movie on “The Late, Late Show,” then “The Late, Late, Late Show” and so on until dawn.
When Leroy Anderson's “The Syncopated Clock" was recorded in 1950, it was noticed by the producers of "The Late Show" and chosen as the theme music. The "Syncopated Clock" was used by the show for the next 25 years. WCBS would also use that recording to introduce a weekday afternoon movie (The Early Show).

oldshowbiz:

Charlie Chan’s entry into the Late, Late Show market, 1954.

Long before the overabundance of chat shows, CBS owned-and-operated stations — most notably WCBS-TV in New York City and WBBM-TV in Chicago — ended the day with an old movie under the heading “The Late Show.” WCBS in New York followed this with another movie on “The Late, Late Show,” then “The Late, Late, Late Show” and so on until dawn.

When Leroy Anderson's “The Syncopated Clock" was recorded in 1950, it was noticed by the producers of "The Late Show" and chosen as the theme music. The "Syncopated Clock" was used by the show for the next 25 years. WCBS would also use that recording to introduce a weekday afternoon movie (The Early Show).

Filed under The Late Show The Early Show Movies on TV CBS Charlie Chan

2 notes

William Lundigan, Aldo Ray and Lucille Ball in “K.O. Kitty” on Desilu Playhouse. This was Ball’s first television role that was not Lucy Ricardo. She played a dance teacher who inherited a boxer. The show aired on November 17, 1958.
If memory serves, Ray as the boxer could only win fights if Ball sang “I Can’t Give You Anything But Love, Baby” to him during the bout.

William Lundigan, Aldo Ray and Lucille Ball in “K.O. Kitty” on Desilu Playhouse. This was Ball’s first television role that was not Lucy Ricardo. She played a dance teacher who inherited a boxer. The show aired on November 17, 1958.

If memory serves, Ray as the boxer could only win fights if Ball sang “I Can’t Give You Anything But Love, Baby” to him during the bout.

6 notes

"The Best of Groucho," 250 episodes from the successful "You Bet Your Life,” did well in syndication.
"You Bet Your Life" was a quiz show that aired on both radio and television, hosted by Groucho Marx of the Marx Brothers, with announcer and assistant George Fenneman. The show debuted on ABC Radio in October 1947, then moved to CBS Radio in September 1949 before making the transition to NBC-TV in October 1950.
The play of the game, however, was secondary to the interplay between Groucho, the contestants, and occasionally Fenneman. The program was rerun as The Best of Groucho. As such, it was the first game show to have its reruns syndicated. (Wikipedia)

"The Best of Groucho," 250 episodes from the successful "You Bet Your Life,” did well in syndication.

"You Bet Your Life" was a quiz show that aired on both radio and television, hosted by Groucho Marx of the Marx Brothers, with announcer and assistant George Fenneman. The show debuted on ABC Radio in October 1947, then moved to CBS Radio in September 1949 before making the transition to NBC-TV in October 1950.

The play of the game, however, was secondary to the interplay between Groucho, the contestants, and occasionally Fenneman. The program was rerun as The Best of Groucho. As such, it was the first game show to have its reruns syndicated. (Wikipedia)

(Source: oldshowbiz)