ladiesofthe70s:

Marcia Wallace (1942–2013) was an actress, voice artist, comedian, and game show panelist, primarily known for her roles in television situation comedies. She is best known for her roles as receptionist Carol Kester on the 1970s sitcom The Bob Newhart Show (above) and as the voice of elementary school teacher Edna Krabappel on the animated series The Simpsons, for which she won an Emmy in 1992.

ladiesofthe70s:

Marcia Wallace (1942–2013) was an actress, voice artist, comedian, and game show panelist, primarily known for her roles in television situation comedies. She is best known for her roles as receptionist Carol Kester on the 1970s sitcom The Bob Newhart Show (above) and as the voice of elementary school teacher Edna Krabappel on the animated series The Simpsons, for which she won an Emmy in 1992.

wordfromoursponsor:

US Steel Hour: Theatre Guild on the Air featured “the best plays, the best stars” in “the best dramatic entertainment on radio” (Sponsor magazine, 1951).

wordfromoursponsor:

US Steel Hour: Theatre Guild on the Air featured “the best plays, the best stars” in “the best dramatic entertainment on radio” (Sponsor magazine, 1951).

funkyfindsofohio:

1970s Yellow Zenith N092G 9” Portable Television.
kafkasapartment:

Radio Sonder - Ausstellung (Radio Special -Exhibition),1924.  Josef Hoffmann.

kafkasapartment:

Radio Sonder - Ausstellung (Radio Special -Exhibition),1924.  Josef Hoffmann.

(via fullframehappy)

magictransistor:

Cooley, Austin G. ‘How to Receive Radio Pictures at Home.’ New York: Radiovision Corp., 1928. 1st edition.
"Tomorrow seemed to be almost there to readers of this pamphlet, what with the idea of looking at pictures relating to the radio broadcast you were listening to looming before a slightly disbelieving mind. 
"The fact of the matter though is that this breakthrough by Mr. Austin G. Cooley — basically attaching what we would know today as a fax machine to a radio cabinet which would receive and print images relating to the show being heard — was rubbing up mightily against the real wave of the future, the television…" — JF Ptak Science Books

magictransistor:

Cooley, Austin G. ‘How to Receive Radio Pictures at Home.’ New York: Radiovision Corp., 1928. 1st edition.

"Tomorrow seemed to be almost there to readers of this pamphlet, what with the idea of looking at pictures relating to the radio broadcast you were listening to looming before a slightly disbelieving mind. 

"The fact of the matter though is that this breakthrough by Mr. Austin G. Cooley — basically attaching what we would know today as a fax machine to a radio cabinet which would receive and print images relating to the show being heard — was rubbing up mightily against the real wave of the future, the television…" — JF Ptak Science Books

Martin Kane, Private Eye was an early radio series and television crime series sponsored by United States Tobacco Company. It began on the Mutual Broadcasting System in 1949, then moved to NBC Radio in 1951.
William Gargan, Lloyd Nolan, Lee Tracy, and Mark Stevens played the title role in Martin Kane, Private Eye on live television, airing on NBC Television from 1949 until 1954. The series, again sponsored by United States Tobacco Company, integrated commercials into the detective drama by having Martin Kane enter his favorite tobacco shop where he discussed pipe tobaccos and cigarettes with the tobacconist Happy McMann (Walter Kinsella), before leaving to continue the mystery narrative.
The radio-TV series had a 1950 tie-in comic book, Martin Kane, Private Eye, published by Fox and illustrated by Wally Wood, Joe Orlando and Martin Rosenthal. (Wikipedia)

Martin Kane, Private Eye was an early radio series and television crime series sponsored by United States Tobacco Company. It began on the Mutual Broadcasting System in 1949, then moved to NBC Radio in 1951.

William Gargan, Lloyd Nolan, Lee Tracy, and Mark Stevens played the title role in Martin Kane, Private Eye on live television, airing on NBC Television from 1949 until 1954. The series, again sponsored by United States Tobacco Company, integrated commercials into the detective drama by having Martin Kane enter his favorite tobacco shop where he discussed pipe tobaccos and cigarettes with the tobacconist Happy McMann (Walter Kinsella), before leaving to continue the mystery narrative.

The radio-TV series had a 1950 tie-in comic book, Martin Kane, Private Eye, published by Fox and illustrated by Wally Wood, Joe Orlando and Martin Rosenthal. (Wikipedia)

(Source: driveintheaterofthemind)

Martha Raye was a television star very early in its history, and even had her own program for a while, The Martha Raye Show (1954–1956), with an awkward boyfriend portrayed by retired middleweight boxer Rocky Graziano. She also appeared on other TV shows in the 1950s, such as What’s My Line?.
Later in her career, she made television commercials for Polident denture cleanser, principally during the 1970s and 1980s.

Martha Raye was a television star very early in its history, and even had her own program for a while, The Martha Raye Show (1954–1956), with an awkward boyfriend portrayed by retired middleweight boxer Rocky Graziano. She also appeared on other TV shows in the 1950s, such as What’s My Line?.

Later in her career, she made television commercials for Polident denture cleanser, principally during the 1970s and 1980s.

(Source: oldshowbiz)

Richard Lewis and Jamie Lee Curtis in Anything But Love (ABC, 1989-1992). Lewis and Curtis played coworkers at a Chicago magazine with a mutual romantic attraction to each other, who struggled to keep their relationship strictly professional.

Richard Lewis and Jamie Lee Curtis in Anything But Love (ABC, 1989-1992). Lewis and Curtis played coworkers at a Chicago magazine with a mutual romantic attraction to each other, who struggled to keep their relationship strictly professional.

(Source: mythirdparent)

From the 1965-66 season onward, a number of celebrities guest starred on The Lucy Show, usually playing themselves under the premise that the Lucy Carmichael character, now living in Hollywood, crossed paths with them, either in her day-to-day life, or through her job at the bank.
The episode featuring Joan Crawford, “Lucy and the Lost Star,” caused much celebrity fodder given Ball and Crawford’s very public feud during the filming. According to Ball, Crawford was often drunk on the set and could not remember her lines. Ball was said to have requested several times to replace Crawford with Gloria Swanson, who was supposed to have filled the role originally but bowed out due to health reasons.
Crawford was so upset that at one point, she wouldn’t leave her dressing room. According to Ball’s friend, singer-comedienne Kaye Ballard, it was Vanda Barra, a featured actress frequently used on The Lucy Show, who finally persuaded Crawford to continue with the show by giving her a much needed pep talk. As a result, Crawford sailed through the filming with nary a flaw. (Wikipedia)

From the 1965-66 season onward, a number of celebrities guest starred on The Lucy Show, usually playing themselves under the premise that the Lucy Carmichael character, now living in Hollywood, crossed paths with them, either in her day-to-day life, or through her job at the bank.

The episode featuring Joan Crawford, “Lucy and the Lost Star,” caused much celebrity fodder given Ball and Crawford’s very public feud during the filming. According to Ball, Crawford was often drunk on the set and could not remember her lines. Ball was said to have requested several times to replace Crawford with Gloria Swanson, who was supposed to have filled the role originally but bowed out due to health reasons.

Crawford was so upset that at one point, she wouldn’t leave her dressing room. According to Ball’s friend, singer-comedienne Kaye Ballard, it was Vanda Barra, a featured actress frequently used on The Lucy Show, who finally persuaded Crawford to continue with the show by giving her a much needed pep talk. As a result, Crawford sailed through the filming with nary a flaw. (Wikipedia)

(Source: facebook.com)

"Elektro the Moto-Man" is the name of a robot built by the Westinghouse Electric Corporation in its Mansfield, Ohio facility between 1937 and 1939. Seven feet tall (2.1 m), weighing 265 pounds (120.2 kg), humanoid in appearance, he could walk by voice command, speak about 700 words (using a 78-rpm record player), smoke cigarettes, blow up balloons, and move his head and arms.

Elektro’s body consisted of a steel gear, cam and motor skeleton covered by an aluminum skin. His photoelectric “eyes” could distinguish red and green light. He was on exhibit at the 1939 New York World’s Fair and reappeared at that fair in 1940, with “Sparko,” a robot dog that could bark, sit, and beg.

Elektro toured North America in 1950 in promotional appearances for Westinghouse, and was displayed at Pacific Ocean Park in Venice, California in the late 1950s and early 1960s. He also appeared as “Thinko” in the  movie Sex Kittens Go to College (1960).

In the 1960s, his head was given to a retiring Westinghouse engineer. Elektro survived the scrap pile and is currently the property of the Mansfield Memorial Museum.

(Source: magictransistor)