@Bcast_Md

Special Collections in Mass Media and Culture

27 notes

wordfromoursponsor:

"Something the Reds haven’t got…it directs civilian defense, it guides the Armed Forces. It’s the biggest and most dependable telephone network on earth." (Western Electric ad, 1951)

wordfromoursponsor:

"Something the Reds haven’t got…it directs civilian defense, it guides the Armed Forces. It’s the biggest and most dependable telephone network on earth." (Western Electric ad, 1951)

41 notes

popuparchive:

Digital doesn’t mean permanent: Using the Internet Archive to protect against “erase all”  

To many, the effort to preserve audio files ends at digitization. After all, a physical object — like a record or even CD — decays. A string of data on your computer doesn’t. But what if you delete the string? What if the computer breaks? The truth is, managing digital files comes with its own set of risks.

As we transition into an all-digital media landscape, digital materials can be even more prone to loss than physical recordings. “Born digital” files can easily be lost irretrievably. Whether a destructive coffee spill or an overzealous hard drive purge, it’s disturbingly easy to lose the source files for your audio. 

So how do you protect your most precious audio files? Enter, the Internet Archive: The Internet Archive (archive.org) is an Internet library based in San Francisco. It was created with the mission of preserving materials on the web for generations to come, even in the face of rapidly changing file standards and operating systems. In addition to public domain books, films, and other digital media, they also store hundreds of thousands of hours of audio. And with Pop Up Archive, you can easily contribute your collection to their growing library.

Pop Up Archive lets you preserve audio on Internet Archive servers in just one click. Simply select the Internet Archive option while creating a Pop Up Archive collection, and a copy of each audio item page will be “filed” at the Internet Archive — ensuring that your most valuable recordings become part of the public record.

14 notes

russewell:

Kung Fu, a classic TV series… Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story strongly argues this film and role were created by and should have belonged to Bruce Lee. I loved the show as a kid, but imagine Bruce Lee…wow!

Kung Fu aired on ABC from 1972 to 1975. The series was preceded by a full-length feature television pilot, an ABC Movie of the Week, which was broadcast on February 22, 1972.
The series follows the adventures of Kwai Chang Caine (portrayed by David Carradine as an adult, Keith Carradine as a teenager, and Radames Pera as a young boy), a Shaolin monk who travels through the American Old West armed only with his spiritual training and his skill in martial arts, as he seeks Danny Caine, his half-brother. (Wikipedia)

russewell:

Kung Fu, a classic TV series… Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story strongly argues this film and role were created by and should have belonged to Bruce Lee. I loved the show as a kid, but imagine Bruce Lee…wow!

Kung Fu aired on ABC from 1972 to 1975. The series was preceded by a full-length feature television pilot, an ABC Movie of the Week, which was broadcast on February 22, 1972.

The series follows the adventures of Kwai Chang Caine (portrayed by David Carradine as an adult, Keith Carradine as a teenager, and Radames Pera as a young boy), a Shaolin monk who travels through the American Old West armed only with his spiritual training and his skill in martial arts, as he seeks Danny Caine, his half-brother. (Wikipedia)