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Posts tagged MeTV Summer of Classic TV

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The Lucy Show: Almost — Just For a Moment — Feminist

As pointed out in Desilu: The Story of Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz, the first season of The Lucy Show was “far superior to its subsequent five seasons” and was almost — but not quite — groundbreaking. In some ways, it picked up where I Love Lucy left off: the setting was still Connecticut and Lucy was still essentially Lucy. But now she was a widow with two children sharing her house with a divorcee (possibly the first such continuing character on television) with one child.

The two women, who had served together in the WAVES ( U.S. Naval Women’s Reserve), tried to blend their families, attempted to operate home businesses, organized an all-female volunteer fire department, and did the things they would have previously depended on a husband to do, such as installing a television antenna or a shower stall.

Rich possibilities were there but they weren’t fully explored and, after a time, they weren’t explored at all. It probably didn’t help that some wags at the network were calling the program “The Dykes Sans Dick Show.” Ultimately, Lucy and Vivian became two women competing for male attention.

The better episodes in the early seasons can be credited to Desi Arnaz. The book Desilu quotes him: “The property to follow I Love Lucy was based on a book that we bought, Life Without George. It was very carefully considered for many reasons. We didn’t want to copy Lucy, and at the same time, we didn’t want to go too far away from the Lucy character. We all agreed that the fact of these two women trying to raise children, make a living, face plumbing problems, etc., etc., without a man around the house, offered tremendous possibilities. But when I read a script such as ‘Lucy Flies a Helicopter,’ it makes me wonder if anybody ever read the book. If they didn’t, then perhaps it would be wise to have them re-read it, very carefully.”

But it didn’t happen, for a variety of reasons, not the least of which was Desi Arnaz being bought out by Lucille Ball and leaving Desilu. Television audiences would have to wait until Kate and Allie (1984-1989) to see the comedic possibilities of this situation explored.

This post is part of Me-TV’s Summer of Classic TV Blogathon, which ends today.  Hosted by the Classic TV Blog Association, you can find a complete list of posts in this blogathon at http://classic-tv-blog-assoc.blogspot.com. You can also go to http://metvnetwork.com to learn more about Me-TV and view its summer line-up of classic TV shows.

Photos from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch photo collection.

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Filed under The Lucy Show Lucille Ball Vivian Vance 1960s MeTV Summer of Classic TV

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(Re)Construction Worker Wanted: Reconsidering Joe Gerard on Rhoda
"After the first two successful and extremely hilarious seasons of Rhoda, the writers decided that a complacent and married Rho was not in the makings for sitcom-bliss. In a December 1976 issue of TV Guide, one of Rhoda's producers, Charlotte Brown spoke about the difficulty they were having with creating storylines. She said, 'Sometimes we’d sit around for days to think up a single story with some conflict that could focus on Rhoda.'
"This led to the third season separation storyline where Joe decides to tell Rhoda that he’s been "feeling restless" and wants the couple to live apart. At the time, David Groh, the actor who played Rhoda’s husband Joe Gerard, thought it was a great avenue to explore…"
— From the Made for TV Mayhem blog. This post is part of Me-TV’s Summer of Classic TV Blogathon hosted by the Classic TV Blog Association. Go to http://classic-tv-blog-assoc.blogspot.com) to view more posts in this blogathon. You can also go to http://metvnetwork.com to learn more about Me-TV and view its summer line-up of classic TV shows.

(Re)Construction Worker Wanted: Reconsidering Joe Gerard on Rhoda

"After the first two successful and extremely hilarious seasons of Rhoda, the writers decided that a complacent and married Rho was not in the makings for sitcom-bliss. In a December 1976 issue of TV Guide, one of Rhoda's producers, Charlotte Brown spoke about the difficulty they were having with creating storylines. She said, 'Sometimes we’d sit around for days to think up a single story with some conflict that could focus on Rhoda.'

"This led to the third season separation storyline where Joe decides to tell Rhoda that he’s been "feeling restless" and wants the couple to live apart. At the time, David Groh, the actor who played Rhoda’s husband Joe Gerard, thought it was a great avenue to explore…"

— From the Made for TV Mayhem blog. This post is part of Me-TV’s Summer of Classic TV Blogathon hosted by the Classic TV Blog Association. Go to http://classic-tv-blog-assoc.blogspot.com) to view more posts in this blogathon. You can also go to http://metvnetwork.com to learn more about Me-TV and view its summer line-up of classic TV shows.

Filed under Rhoda Valerie Harper David Groh 1970s MeTV Summer of Classic TV

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Columbo: Why We Watch / Why it Matters
"Altogether, the show aired over 32 years; 35 counting Prescription: Murder, made in 1968. One half the biblical “three score and 10” is not, well, half-bad for TV…
"So the show began before I was born, the play is older than my parents’ marriage, and even my dad, who introduced me to the 1970s TV series when I was in elementary school, hadn’t himself graduated from high school by 1960.
"Why then do I watch?
"Why then do we?”
From the How Sweet It Was blog. This post is part of Me-TV’s Summer of Classic TV Blogathon hosted by the Classic TV Blog Association. Go to http://classic-tv-blog-assoc.blogspot.com) to view more posts in this blogathon. You can also go to http://metvnetwork.com to learn more about Me-TV and view its summer line-up of classic TV shows.

Columbo: Why We Watch / Why it Matters

"Altogether, the show aired over 32 years; 35 counting Prescription: Murder, made in 1968. One half the biblical “three score and 10” is not, well, half-bad for TV…

"So the show began before I was born, the play is older than my parents’ marriage, and even my dad, who introduced me to the 1970s TV series when I was in elementary school, hadn’t himself graduated from high school by 1960.

"Why then do I watch?

"Why then do we?”

From the How Sweet It Was blog. This post is part of Me-TV’s Summer of Classic TV Blogathon hosted by the Classic TV Blog Association. Go to http://classic-tv-blog-assoc.blogspot.com) to view more posts in this blogathon. You can also go to http://metvnetwork.com to learn more about Me-TV and view its summer line-up of classic TV shows.

Filed under Columbo Peter Falk Classic TV TV Mystery MeTV Summer of Classic TV

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Boris Karloff’s anthology TV series: It’s a THRILLER!

"From the show’s opening iconic musical score, you know something deliciously sinister is about to occur. The word THRILLER appears against a fractured white web like graphic title design quite a bit in the style ofSaul Bass. The discordant piano and horn stabs of modern jazz already bring you into the inner sanctum of menacing story telling. As Boris would often say as a precursory welcome,’Let me assure you ladies and gentlemen, as sure as my name is Boris Karloff, this is a thriller’…

"The format had somewhat ambivalent themes, leaving the show’s narrative straddling both genres of crime melodrama and tales of the macabre. But… either of these atmospheres created by some of the best writers, directors and players delivered a highly intoxicating blend of both, remaining a powerful anthology with unique dramatic flare…"

From The Last Drive-In blog. This post is part of Me-TV’s Summer of Classic TV Blogathon hosted by the Classic TV Blog Association. Go to http://classic-tv-blog-assoc.blogspot.com) to view more posts in this blogathon. You can also go to http://metvnetwork.com to learn more about Me-TV and view its summer line-up of classic TV shows.

Filed under Boris Karloff Thriller Martita Hunt 1960s MeTV Summer of Classic TV

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A Look at The Odd Couple
"For both Tony Randall and Jack Klugman, it was their appearance in The Odd Couple for which they became household names and genuine TV stars. Yes, they were both well known and respected before the show but they moved on up to another level afterward.  As I mentioned earlier the show became iconic after its network run ended and it went into what seemed like permanent reruns. Today, Klugman and Randall have overshadowed Lemmon and Matthau and for many, like myself, are the two actors most associated with the roles of Oscar and Felix. During the run, Klugman would go on to win two Emmys and Tony Randall one. Not bad…”
From the Twenty-four Frames blog. This post is part of Me-TV’s Summer of Classic TV Blogathon hosted by the Classic TV Blog Association. Go to http://classic-tv-blog-assoc.blogspot.com) to view more posts in this blogathon. You can also go to http://metvnetwork.com to learn more about Me-TV and view its summer line-up of classic TV shows.

A Look at The Odd Couple

"For both Tony Randall and Jack Klugman, it was their appearance in The Odd Couple for which they became household names and genuine TV stars. Yes, they were both well known and respected before the show but they moved on up to another level afterward.  As I mentioned earlier the show became iconic after its network run ended and it went into what seemed like permanent reruns. Today, Klugman and Randall have overshadowed Lemmon and Matthau and for many, like myself, are the two actors most associated with the roles of Oscar and Felix. During the run, Klugman would go on to win two Emmys and Tony Randall one. Not bad…”

From the Twenty-four Frames blog. This post is part of Me-TV’s Summer of Classic TV Blogathon hosted by the Classic TV Blog Association. Go to http://classic-tv-blog-assoc.blogspot.com) to view more posts in this blogathon. You can also go to http://metvnetwork.com to learn more about Me-TV and view its summer line-up of classic TV shows.

Filed under The Odd Couple Jack Klugman Tony Randall 1960s MeTV Summer of Classic TV

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Leave it to Beaver: A Father’s Journey
"From Leave It to Beaver’s premier in 1957, TV critics recognized a small innovation that the show introduced to TV—its point of view. ‘With Beaver, we aimed at showing the child’s view of this world,” Joe Connelly told the Associated Press in 1960. Connelly, with Bob Mosher, created and produced the series.
"In my opinion, however, the show’s perspective is more complicated than that. Leave it to Beaver shows a child’s world as filtered through the perspective of a warm but bewildered father—a father who is groping toward a new model for fatherhood, quite different from the one he experienced growing up…”
— From the Embarrassing Treasures blog. This post is part of Me-TV’s Summer of Classic TV Blogathon hosted by the Classic TV Blog Association. Go to http://classic-tv-blog-assoc.blogspot.com) to view more posts in this blogathon. You can also go to http://metvnetwork.com to learn more about Me-TV and view its summer line-up of classic TV shows.

Leave it to Beaver: A Father’s Journey

"From Leave It to Beaver’s premier in 1957, TV critics recognized a small innovation that the show introduced to TV—its point of view. ‘With Beaver, we aimed at showing the child’s view of this world,” Joe Connelly told the Associated Press in 1960. Connelly, with Bob Mosher, created and produced the series.

"In my opinion, however, the show’s perspective is more complicated than that. Leave it to Beaver shows a child’s world as filtered through the perspective of a warm but bewildered father—a father who is groping toward a new model for fatherhood, quite different from the one he experienced growing up…”

— From the Embarrassing Treasures blog. This post is part of Me-TV’s Summer of Classic TV Blogathon hosted by the Classic TV Blog Association. Go to http://classic-tv-blog-assoc.blogspot.com) to view more posts in this blogathon. You can also go to http://metvnetwork.com to learn more about Me-TV and view its summer line-up of classic TV shows.

Filed under Leave it to Beaver Hugh Beaumont Jerry Mathers 1950s MeTV Summer of Classic TV

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“Bewitched, Bothered, and Belittled”
“The character of Uncle Arthur always appealed to my pun-loving nature, and the practical jokes he loved to play while slyly grinning and ensnaring his latest victim of warlock waywardness appealed to my teenage sense of fun. Paul Lynde’s performances as Uncle Arthur inspired me to make fun if I wasn’t having any, and look for the laughter where there might not be any.
"But his first appearance on Bewitched had nothing to do with Endora’s younger brother, Arthur. The very first time Paul Lynde appeared on Bewitched in 1966, he had to tell Samantha how rotten she was. He didn’t want to, but it was his job…”
— From the Christy’s Inwells blog. This post is part of Me-TV’s Summer of Classic TV Blogathon hosted by the Classic TV Blog Association. Go to http://classic-tv-blog-assoc.blogspot.com) to view more posts in this blogathon. You can also go to http://metvnetwork.com to learn more about Me-TV and view its summer line-up of classic TV shows.

“Bewitched, Bothered, and Belittled”

The character of Uncle Arthur always appealed to my pun-loving nature, and the practical jokes he loved to play while slyly grinning and ensnaring his latest victim of warlock waywardness appealed to my teenage sense of fun. Paul Lynde’s performances as Uncle Arthur inspired me to make fun if I wasn’t having any, and look for the laughter where there might not be any.

"But his first appearance on Bewitched had nothing to do with Endora’s younger brother, Arthur. The very first time Paul Lynde appeared on Bewitched in 1966, he had to tell Samantha how rotten she was. He didn’t want to, but it was his job…”

— From the Christy’s Inwells blog. This post is part of Me-TV’s Summer of Classic TV Blogathon hosted by the Classic TV Blog Association. Go to http://classic-tv-blog-assoc.blogspot.com) to view more posts in this blogathon. You can also go to http://metvnetwork.com to learn more about Me-TV and view its summer line-up of classic TV shows.

Filed under Bewitched Paul Lynde Elizabeth Montgomery 1960s MeTV Summer of Classic TV

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Me-TV Blogathon: The Dick Van Dyke Show
“What I love about The Dick Van Dyke Show is the fact that life isn’t perfect in the Petrie household or in the writers’ office at the “Alan Brady Show.” What is perfect is the writing and casting, with Van Dyke and Mary Tyler Moore portraying a married couple madly in love and yet they bicker and point out each other’s faults. It’s been said often that Rob and Laura Petrie were the first sexy couple on TV. Despite the separate beds, you knew what was happening off screen…”
From the Classic Film Boy’s Movie Paradise blog. This post is part of Me-TV’s Summer of Classic TV Blogathon hosted by the Classic TV Blog Association. Go to http://classic-tv-blog-assoc.blogspot.com) to view more posts in this blogathon. You can also go to http://metvnetwork.com to learn more about Me-TV and view its summer line-up of classic TV shows.

Me-TV Blogathon: The Dick Van Dyke Show

What I love about The Dick Van Dyke Show is the fact that life isn’t perfect in the Petrie household or in the writers’ office at the “Alan Brady Show.” What is perfect is the writing and casting, with Van Dyke and Mary Tyler Moore portraying a married couple madly in love and yet they bicker and point out each other’s faults. It’s been said often that Rob and Laura Petrie were the first sexy couple on TV. Despite the separate beds, you knew what was happening off screen…”

From the Classic Film Boy’s Movie Paradise blog. This post is part of Me-TV’s Summer of Classic TV Blogathon hosted by the Classic TV Blog Association. Go to http://classic-tv-blog-assoc.blogspot.com) to view more posts in this blogathon. You can also go to http://metvnetwork.com to learn more about Me-TV and view its summer line-up of classic TV shows.

Filed under The Dick Van Dyke Show Dick Van Dyke Mary Tyler Moore 1960s MeTV Summer of Classic TV

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Me TV Summer of Classic TV Blogathon: I Dream of Jeannie
“I Dream of Jeannie, is a very charming TV show starring Barbara Eden as a 2,000-year-old genie and Larry Hagman as an astronaut who becomes her master, with whom she falls in love. The series was created and produced by Sidney Sheldon, who had trouble finding the perfect genie, until he contacted Barbara Eden’s agent…
"The first bottle was a special Christmas 1964 Jim Beam liquor decanter containing ‘Beam's Choice' bourbon whiskey. It was designed by Roy Kramer for the Wheaton Bottle Company. For years, it was said that Sidney Sheldon received one as a gift and thought it would be a perfect design for the series…”
— From the Noir and Chick Flicks blog. This post is part of Me-TV’s Summer of Classic TV Blogathon hosted by the Classic TV Blog Association. Go to http://classic-tv-blog-assoc.blogspot.com) to view more posts in this blogathon. You can also go to http://metvnetwork.com to learn more about Me-TV and view its summer line-up of classic TV shows.

Me TV Summer of Classic TV Blogathon: I Dream of Jeannie

I Dream of Jeannie, is a very charming TV show starring Barbara Eden as a 2,000-year-old genie and Larry Hagman as an astronaut who becomes her master, with whom she falls in love. The series was created and produced by Sidney Sheldon, who had trouble finding the perfect genie, until he contacted Barbara Eden’s agent…

"The first bottle was a special Christmas 1964 Jim Beam liquor decanter containing ‘Beam's Choice' bourbon whiskey. It was designed by Roy Kramer for the Wheaton Bottle Company. For years, it was said that Sidney Sheldon received one as a gift and thought it would be a perfect design for the series…”

— From the Noir and Chick Flicks blog. This post is part of Me-TV’s Summer of Classic TV Blogathon hosted by the Classic TV Blog Association. Go to http://classic-tv-blog-assoc.blogspot.com) to view more posts in this blogathon. You can also go to http://metvnetwork.com to learn more about Me-TV and view its summer line-up of classic TV shows.

Filed under I Dream of Jeannie Barbara Eden Larry Hagman 1960s MeTV Summer of Classic TV

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The 5 Best “Mission: Impossible” Episodes
"My wife and I compiled this list of favorite episodes of Mission: Impossible, the TV series created by Bruce Geller and which ran for seven seasons. For those unfamiliar with the series, it details the Impossible Missions Force (IMF), a secret agency enlisted for more sensitive assignments, both domestic and foreign. The following selections do not include any episodes from either season of the 1988-90 series update…” (See list here)
— From the Classic Film and TV Cafe blog. This post is part of Me-TV’s Summer of Classic TV Blogathon hosted by the Classic TV Blog Association. Go to http://classic-tv-blog-assoc.blogspot.com) to view more posts in this blogathon. You can also go to http://metvnetwork.com to learn more about Me-TV and view its summer line-up of classic TV shows.

The 5 Best “Mission: Impossible” Episodes

"My wife and I compiled this list of favorite episodes of Mission: Impossible, the TV series created by Bruce Geller and which ran for seven seasons. For those unfamiliar with the series, it details the Impossible Missions Force (IMF), a secret agency enlisted for more sensitive assignments, both domestic and foreign. The following selections do not include any episodes from either season of the 1988-90 series update…” (See list here)

— From the Classic Film and TV Cafe blog. This post is part of Me-TV’s Summer of Classic TV Blogathon hosted by the Classic TV Blog Association. Go to http://classic-tv-blog-assoc.blogspot.com) to view more posts in this blogathon. You can also go to http://metvnetwork.com to learn more about Me-TV and view its summer line-up of classic TV shows.

Filed under Mission Impossible Martin Landau Barbara Bain 1960s MeTV Summer of Classic TV